Commisioning Ceremony Program
USS CHARLES P. CECIL (DD 835)


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U.S.S. CHARLES P. CECIL
(DD835)
 
 
COMMISSIONING PROGRAM
 
NAVY YARD, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
29 JUNE 1945
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                ORDER OF EVENTS
    

Original Engraved Invitation sent out to all invited guests. It was contributed by Joe Porter an original Cecil Plank Owner and S1/c-Firecontrol. Thanks Joe. The Commandant of the First Naval District and the Boston Navy Yard, Bear Admiral Felix Gygax, U. S. Navy, goes aboard for commissioning. The Commandant directs that the ship be placed in com- mission. All hands face In the direction that the colors are to be hoisted. The band plays the National Anthem. Colors and com- mission pennant are hoisted. The Admiral'is flag is broken and the commission pennant is lowered. (Honbrii by the band). The Commandant introduces'the Chaplain. Invocation by Chaplain. Address by the Commandant. The Commandant turns the ship over to the Prospective Commanding Officer, Commander W. Outerson, U. S. Navy. The Prospective Commanding Officer reads his orders and assumes command. The first watch is set. The Commanding Officer reads a letter from the Secretary of the Navy. The Commanding Officer addresses the Ship's Company. Presentation of Ship's bible by Chaplain. The Commandant makes a brief inspection and departs. The Commission Pennant replaces the Admiral's Flag. The ceremony is completed. Ship is open for inspection by guests.

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The U. S. S. CHARLES P. CECIL (1)1) 835) is named for the late Rear Admiral Charles Purcell Cecil, U. S. Navy.

Admiral Cecil was born at Louisville, Kentucky, on September 4, 1893. He was appointed a Midshipman from the Fifth District of Kentucky in 1912 and upon detachment from the Naval Academy in June, 1916, was commissioned an Ensign. he was first permanently attached to U.S.S. ARIZONA at the time of her commissioning in 1916, and thereafter served on board the U.S.S. YANKTON, BALLARD, ROCHESTER, ABEL P. UPSHUR, PITTSBURGH, TEXAS. WEST VIRGINIA, ARKANSAS, GREER, CUMMINGS and HELENA. In 1942-1943 he commanded Destroyers, Task Force Seventeen and U.S.S. HELENA, during which assignments he was awarded the Navy Cross, and Gold Star in lieu of a Second Navy Cross and was cited as follows:

NAVY CROSS:

"For extrordinary heroism as Commanding Officer of a destroyer group of a Task Force during action against enemy Japanese forces off Santa Cruz Island, October 26, 1942. Conducting his group with distinguished and efficient leadership, Captain Cecil and the units under his command maneuvered skillfully in forming a tight defensive screen around our carrier in spite of intense and violent opposition sustained for an hour and a half. His brilliant tactics and the devotion to duty of the units In the destroyer group contributed materially to heavy losses inflicted on attacking Japanese air forces and were important factors In the success of our forces In this engagement".

GOLD STAR in lieu of SECOND NAVY CROSS:

"For extraordinary heroism as Commanding Officer of the U. S. S. HELENA in action against enemy Japanese forces In the Solomon Island on July 5 and 0. 1943. An part of a Task Force in close support of the landing of United States troops at Rice Anchorage on New Georgia Wand, Captain Cecil skillfully maneuvered his ship through the restricted submarine-infested waters and effectively bombarded enemy shore batteries and installations In the face of Intense Japanese gun and torpedo fire. Twenty-four hours later the HELENA participated In an engagement with a numerically superior Japanese naval force and contributed materially to the sinking or severe damaging of all hostile vessels before she was mortally hit by enemy torpedo fire. Calmly, and without confusion, Captain Cecil directed the abandonment of his sinking ship and continued the supervision of rescue operations from a small life raft. His gallant and inspiring leadership under fire and his courageous devotion to duty reflect great credit upon the United States Naval Service".

The U. S. S. CHARLES P. CECIL was launched at 1037 on 22 April 1945, at the Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. The Sponsor was Mrs. Charles P. Cecil, wife of the late Rear Admiral Charles P. Cecil, U.S.N.

 
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COMMANDER W. OUTERSON, USN
commanding

LIEUTENANT R. G. BIENVENU, USN
Executive Officer

LIEUTENANT F. M. NELSON, USN
Gunnery Officer

LIEUTENANT J. B. STEIDEL, USNR
Communication Officer

LIEUTENANT (jg) G. P. REILLY, USNR
Engineering Officer

LIEUTENANT (jg) D. W. GIBB, USN
First Lieutenant and Damage Control Officer

LIEUTENANT (jg) C. F. STRINGER (MC) USNR
Medical Officer

ENSIGN U. P. QUINN (SC) USN
Supply and Disbursing Offteer

BUILT BY BATH IRON WORKS CORPORATION
BATH, MAINE

MR. WILLIAM S. NEWELL, President
CAPTAIN RUSSELL S. HITCHCOCK, U. S. N.
Supervisor of Shipbuilding

Builders: Bath Iron Works Corporation
Bath, Maine

Launched: April 22,1945
Commissioned: June 29,1945
Type: 2250 ton long hull picket
Displacent: 3400 tons (full load)
Length: 391 feet
Beam: 41 feet
Mean Draft: 14 feet
Personnel: Officers: 21
Enlisted Men: 350
Armament:    6 5"/38 (twin mounts)
                    12 40mm (quad mounts)
                       4 40mm (twin mounts)
                    16 20mm (twin mounts)
                       6 Depth Charge Throwers
                       2 Depth Charge Racks
Designed Speed: About 35 knots (40 m.p.h.)
Designed Horsepower: 60,000
Twin Screws
Twin Rudders

In addition this ship carries radar and other special equipment details of which cannot be divulged at this time.